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Showing posts from September, 2012

Do consumers really care about data privacy?

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privacy_stats_v2_072512 (1).pdf Download this file Placecast conducted a survey using Harris Interactive titled "Alert Shopper III." The survey was focused around data privacy and consumer views on companies dealing with personal consumer data. The results showed that U.S adults are more than twice as likely to trust Amazon with their personal data as they are Facebook. Grocery stores were rated as the most trustworthy in terms of consumer data usage when compared with Facebook, Amazon, Google, and cell phone providers. Here is the infographic   The survey showed that 66 percent of U.S. adults who are aware of use of data by  Amazon find Amazon’s use of personal data somewhat to very acceptable versus 33 percent saying the same for Facebook. More than three-quarters (81%) of U.S. adults who are aware of the use of this data said they were comfortable with a grocery store using their purchase information to deliver coupons tailored to them. Comparatively, just

Why would anyone trust a brand with their data! @clickfox

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Source : ClickFox Consumer Data Audit survey on consumer’s preferences around data management, and which organizations are handling this new market opportunity with the best of care. The survey suggests that consumers are willing to give up personal information to trusted brands if it will help them improve their shopping experience or get a better deal. The majority of customers (over 80 percent) expect their companies to know their previous retail experience, service and purchase history. Those who are in financial services, followed by healthcare and government, earned the most trust in dealing with consumer’s personal data. The retail industry receives poor marks for consumer trust due to wary data use among retailers. And it turns out Google, Amazon, and Apple were revealed as the most trustworthy organizations overall.  Hum.... is there a correlation between levels of regulation and trust? The data indicates that consumers’ acceptance on location-based marketing and

US Mobile Data Market Update Q2 2012 #CHETANSHARMA

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This is the regular update from Chetan on the status of mobile in the US As usual a massive body of work, this is the summary Summary The US mobile data market grew 5% Q/Q and 19% Y/Y to reach $19.3B in Q2 2012. Data is now almost 42% of the US mobile industry service revenues. For the year 2012, the market is on track for mobile data revenues in the US market to reach our initial estimate of $80 billion. The US operators reversed the postpaid decline in last quarter to add almost 400K postpaid subs largely due to the strong performance of Verizon Wireless. Sprint and T-Mobile saw further postpaid declines. For T-Mobile, Q2 marked the eight straight quarters of postpaid losses. In terms of Y/Y growth, Connected Devices segment grew 21%, Prepaid 12%, Wholesale 4%, and Postpaid was flat. AT&T, AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon are number one respectively in these categories. The connected devices segment has been an area of growth for the industry but for the second straight quar

so what happened when Malte Spitz asked his cell phone carrier what it knew about him?

What kind of data is your cell phone company collecting? Malte Spitz wasn’t too worried when he asked his operator in Germany to share information stored about him. Multiple unanswered requests and a lawsuit later, Spitz received 35,830 lines of code -- a detailed, nearly minute-by-minute account of half a year of his life. A great TED video - I also enjoyed the comments however I am remain concerned that at there are two camps on all of this material.... like, engage, find value, embrace, change, acceptance and the other side privacy, hate, wrong, misplaced, worried, FUD. 

will technology really make your life easier?

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsT6ttnBVUA?feature=player_embedded] Saga is an app . The founder Andy Hickl explains that after you run it for a while it will tell you all sorts of stuff about you, and your day coming up......

Why do we think we own our own data and who created this myth?

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I am on the hunt and hoping someone can help me. I continually read that consumers think that they own their own data.   I have no issue with the concept of rights of access, controls and rights of use, but ownership is a totally different matter. I was reading this from CTRL-SHIFT about midata that got me going. Yes you can own your photos and documents you created but that is not the same as owning your bank records or your telephone log.  It is a different issue about what can be collected, what that data can be used for and how long it is held for, but where did this idea that consumers can own their own data come from, who started it and why? 

real names : the good, the bad and the very ugly outcomes.

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Why do we think we own our own data and who created this myth?

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I am on the hunt and hoping someone can help me. I continually read that consumers think that they own their own data.   I have no issue with the concept of rights of access, controls and rights of use, but ownership is a totally different matter. I was reading this from CTRL-SHIFT about midata that got me going. Yes you can own your photos and documents you created but that is not the same as owning your bank records or your telephone log.  It is a different issue about what can be collected, what that data can be used for and how long it is held for, but where did this idea that consumers can own their own data come from, who started it and why? 

Why do we think we own our own data and who created this myth?

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I am on the hunt and hoping someone can help me. I continually read that consumers think that they own their own data.   I have no issue with the concept of rights of access, controls and rights of use, but ownership is a totally different matter. I was reading this from CTRL-SHIFT about midata that got me going. Yes you can own your photos and documents you created but that is not the same as owning your bank records or your telephone log.  It is a different issue about what can be collected, what that data can be used for and how long it is held for, but where did this idea that consumers can own their own data come from, who started it and why? 

Why do we think we own our own data and who created this myth?

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I am on the hunt and hoping someone can help me. I continually read that consumers think that they own their own data.   I have no issue with the concept of rights of access, controls and rights of use, but ownership is a totally different matter. I was reading this from CTRL-SHIFT about midata that got me going. Yes you can own your photos and documents you created but that is not the same as owning your bank records or your telephone log.  It is a different issue about what can be collected, what that data can be used for and how long it is held for, but where did this idea that consumers can own their own data come from, who started it and why? 

Why do we think we own our own data and who created this myth?

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I am on the hunt and hoping someone can help me. I continually read that consumers think that they own their own data.   I have no issue with the concept of rights of access, controls and rights of use, but ownership is a totally different matter. I was reading this from CTRL-SHIFT about midata that got me going. Yes you can own your photos and documents you created but that is not the same as owning your bank records or your telephone log.  It is a different issue about what can be collected, what that data can be used for and how long it is held for, but where did this idea that consumers can own their own data come from, who started it and why? 

How to curate content...

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attitudes to sharing information

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How do you compare on Google to everyone else?

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Can you trust anyone ?

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source: http://www.clickfox.com/insights/consumer-surveys/privacy-and-knowledge-gaps-survey/

How do you feel about a highly customized experience, knowing it's your data that's making the difference?

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Source:  www.baynote.com This Infographic by Baynote, explains why your web browsing and online interactions have become much more personalized based on their paper “The Human Need for Personalization: Psychology, Technology and Science” which defines the psychology, technology and science that underlie a shopper’s desire for a personalized ecommerce experience. How do you feel having a highly customized experience, knowing it’s your data that’s making the difference?

Data in Cap tables .... Capography founded by @timraybouldand @ticketleap.

Capography is a start-up finance resource for founders and aspiring entrepreneurs founded by @timraybould and @ticketleap. Being an entrepreneur and knowing how to do your startup’s capitalisation table require special skills and time. A cap table lists who owns what in a startup. With each investment round, the valuation of your company changes as more people are involved. You sometimes have to manage options and warrants for your employees as well. Maintaining a cap table is important to know what everyone gets paid in case of an exit. Capography has adopted a freemium model. You can maintain your cap table for free as long as there are fewer than 20 people on your cap table. When you have more stakeholders than that, you will have to pay $199 per year. It is based in Philadelphia and about 600 startups are using it to manage their cap table. Just love it - well done but can they draw anything from the data?

Y0u come with nothing, You leave with nothing, so who owns your digital footprint?

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  source : http://www.marketwatch.com/story/who-inherits-your-itunes-library-2012-08-23 Much has been written about the Bruce Willis "case" of his iTunes library but most digital content exists in a legal black hole..... So you want to give away your data ... You use Dad's credit cards to purchase itunes and books You have shared content from other You provide password access You have some original works You have purchased your own content.... What the terms say and what we are doing are very different but which trusted Brand is going to take us the consumer on? Tell you what lets ignore the issue and find a new format so you can buy it all again?

myths and facts about smart meters - can they see into your home?

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http://smartgridcc.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/SGCC-Myths-vs.-Facts-Fact-Sheet.pdf The Smart Grid Consumer Collaborative (SGCC) recently published a fact sheet and released a web video to refute privacy and data security critiques of smart meter technology. SGCC is a non-profit that seeks “to advance the adoption of a reliable, efficient, and secure smart grid.” Its membership includes electric utility and technology companies, universities, government agencies, and environmental advocacy groups. Privacy and data security concerns have led some consumers to oppose the installation of smart meters, and even inspired lawsuits in states such as Maine and Illinois. SGCC’s recently published materials suggest that many of these concerns are based on “myths” and “urban legend.”

Anonymous: instructions on fooling facial recognition

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 “While the government may be hell bent on watching us at every moment of every day, we are not helpless. There are always ways of fighting back. Let's remind them that 1984 was not an instruction manual!” 

Welcome to the new reputation economy via @RachelBotsman

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This post is a straight link to Wired September article on the reputation economy - worth reading in full.   http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2012/09/features/welcome-to-the-new-reputation-economy?page=all -

Welcome to the new reputation economy via @RachelBotsman

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This post is a straight link to Wired September article on the reputation economy - worth reading in full.   http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2012/09/features/welcome-to-the-new-reputation-economy?page=all -

Welcome to the new reputation economy via @RachelBotsman

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This post is a straight link to Wired September article on the reputation economy - worth reading in full.   http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2012/09/features/welcome-to-the-new-reputation-economy?page=all -

Welcome to the new reputation economy via @RachelBotsman

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This post is a straight link to Wired September article on the reputation economy - worth reading in full.    https://www.wired.co.uk/article/welcome-to-the-new-reputation-economy

Welcome to the new reputation economy via @RachelBotsman

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This post is a straight link to Wired September article on the reputation economy - worth reading in full.   http://www.wired.co.uk/magazine/archive/2012/09/features/welcome-to-the-new-reputation-economy?page=all -

re-identification: the fatal flaw that means it is not quite as it seams

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The Re identification.pdf Download this file Daniel Barth-Jones has a critique of re-identification studies that informs the conversation about risks: In a recent Health Affairs blog article, he provided a critical re-examination of the famous re-identification of Massachusetts Governor William Weld’s health information. This famous re-identification attack was popularized by recently appointed FTC Senior Privacy Adviser, Paul Ohm, in his 2010 paper “Broken Promises of Privacy”. Ohm’s paper provides a gripping account of Latanya Sweeney’s famous re-identification of Weld’s health insurance data using a Cambridge, MA voter list. The Weld attack has been frequently cited echoing Ohm’s claim that computer scientists can purportedly identify individuals within de-identified data with “astonishing ease.” However, the voter list supposedly used to “re-identify” Weld contained only 54,000 residents and Cambridge demographics at the time of the re-identification attempt show that

Can you Keep Private Photos Private?

McAfee, the Intel-owned security firm, wants to try. McAfee released a new app that lets users add an extra layer of protection to their Facebook photos. The app asks users to explicitly list who should be able to see their photos. To everyone else, the photos will appear fuzzy regardless of who likes, shares, comments or is tagged in them. And nobody — not even those who have access to the photos — can grab, download or print them. Any attempt to capture an image of a user’s screen will result in blank space. And because the app sends the photos to McAfee’s servers, not Facebook’s, it is able to turn off the save and downloading features.

FTC views on why you should get privacy right from the start with mobile

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bus81-marketing-your-mobile-app.pdf Download this file The FTC has been focused on mobile apps and the legal issues they raise, and that focus continues to be shown by the most recent guidance from the FTC. Marketing Your Mobile App: Get it Right From the Start, offers guidance to app developers regarding what the FTC believes should be done to protect consumers in the mobile world. The FTC clearly is speaking to smaller, as well as larger companies that use the mobile platforms to create apps, as the FTC clearly states up front its view that the guidance, and the relevant laws, are equally applicable to small and large companies.

Data Can't Tell You everything about Customers, customer can think! they have agency

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Source : http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/08/what_data_cant_tell_you_about.html The simple idea here is how do you know what a wink means? However this needs to be set in context of Dan Ariely work Across industries, companies are using the vast amounts of user-generated data to guide innovation of new products and services. But data mining does not equate to developing “customer intelligence,” write Lara Lee and Daniel Sobol of Continuum on Harvard Business Review’s Blog. Human behavior is nuanced and complex, and no matter how robust it is, data can provide only part of the story. Desire and motivation are influenced by psychological, social, and cultural factors that require context and conversation in order to decode. Data can reveal new patterns that point a firm in the right direction, but it can’t indicate what to do once there. It reveals what people do, but not why they do it. And understanding the why is critical to innovation.

Consumers Say No to Mobile Apps That Grab Too Much Data

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A  study  (Sept 12) by the Pew Research Center found that among Americans adults who use smartphone apps, half had decided not to install applications on their mobile phones because they demanded too much personal information. Nearly a third uninstalled an application after learning that it was collecting personal information “they didn’t wish to share.” And one in five turned off location tracking “because they were concerned that other individuals or companies could access that information.” A customer’s whereabouts can be extremely valuable to marketers trying to sell their wares, or government authorities trying to keep tabs on citizens’ movements. The study seems to suggest a deepening awareness of digital privacy. And it contradicts a common perception that the generation of young Americans who have grown up in the Internet age blithely share their personal details. Mobile phone users between ages 18 and 29 were equally likely to decline an application because of privacy concer

report . an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry

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The fourth volume of the Mobile Intel Series features an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry. The report contains insights on who the mobile entertainment audience is, how they interact with mobile devices and how entertainment marketers are approaching the mobile space. source : http://www.millennialmedia.com/mobile-intelligence/mobile-intel-series/ millennialmedia-mis-vol4-entertainment.pdf Download this file

report . an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry

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The fourth volume of the Mobile Intel Series features an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry. The report contains insights on who the mobile entertainment audience is, how they interact with mobile devices and how entertainment marketers are approaching the mobile space. source : http://www.millennialmedia.com/mobile-intelligence/mobile-intel-series/ millennialmedia-mis-vol4-entertainment.pdf

report . an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainmentindustry

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The fourth volume of the Mobile Intel Series features an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry. The report contains insights on who the mobile entertainment audience is, how they interact with mobile devices and how entertainment marketers are approaching the mobile space. source : http://www.millennialmedia.com/mobile-intelligence/mobile-intel-series/ millennialmedia-mis-vol4-entertainment.pdf

report . an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainmentindustry

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The fourth volume of the Mobile Intel Series features an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry. The report contains insights on who the mobile entertainment audience is, how they interact with mobile devices and how entertainment marketers are approaching the mobile space. source : http://www.millennialmedia.com/mobile-intelligence/mobile-intel-series/ millennialmedia-mis-vol4-entertainment.pdf

report . an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry

Image
The fourth volume of the Mobile Intel Series features an in-depth look at mobile advertising in the entertainment industry. The report contains insights on who the mobile entertainment audience is, how they interact with mobile devices and how entertainment marketers are approaching the mobile space. source : http://www.millennialmedia.com/mobile-intelligence/mobile-intel-series/ millennialmedia-mis-vol4-entertainment.pdf